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BULLETIN OF 

THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

OF ARCHAEOLOGY 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, MAY, 1925 




MADONNA AND CHILD WITH SAINT JOHN 

ENAMELLED TERRACOTTA MEDALLION 

BY ANDREA DELLA ROBBIA (1435-1525) 



GIFT OF THE FRIENDS OF THE MUSEUM 



Issued by the University of Toronto 



No. 12 



DELLA ROBBIA MEDALLION 

From the very earliest days, sculpture 
in clay seems to have appealed with 
great force to the peoples of the 
Etruscan areas. They had clays 
that were singularly adapted for 
this type of work, except perhaps in 
the question of colour, many of the 
Etruscan pieces that have come 
down to us showing extremely poor 
colour. 

It was natural, therefore, that when 
the art of enamelling clay was brought 
into Italy, probably by way of 
Valencia from North Africa, certain 
sculptors should have realised the 
great opportunity that their clay 
deposits gave them for producing 
in a very direct manner works of 
sculpture of great beauty in colour 
arrangement; and they must also 
have felt that these productions 
would be very permanent, much 
more lasting than marble. 

Luca della Robbia (1400-1482) 
turned his marvellous genius as a 
sculptor in marble to this work in 
enamelled terracotta, and produced 
some of the loveliest things that the 
world has ever seen. Andrea della 
Robbia (1435-1525), the pupil and 
successor of his uncle Luca, had an 
almost equal charm, not perhaps quite 
as grand, yet of very pleasing char- 
acter. 

The example of Andrea's work in 
the Museum is one of a number of 
medallions that were made for re- 
ligious bodies and even for private 
individuals. The extreme charm of 
the heavily clad, girlish figure of the 
Blessed Virgin impresses everyone 
who sees it. Though the drapery 



touches the body scarcely at all, the 
feeling of unusual beauty is carried 
by the very few places where the 
immediate outline is shown. The 
hands and face are very lovely. The 
little St. John and the Christ have also 
an extraordinary attraction. There 
is a slight difference in the head of 
each of the cherubs. 

All of the figures and the lilies 
are in opaque, white, tin enamel, 
the background in an opaque, soft 
blue, and the palm tree and the foli- 
age of the lily in a dark, rich green. 
The eyes of the figures are touched 
in black, and there is a slight line 
for the eyebrows which accentuates 
the sculpture of the eyebrow without 
replacing it. The outer wreath of 
fruit is in strong, rich colours. 

This piece was in the Kahn Collec- 
tion, which was purchased by Messrs. 
Duveen and dispersed by them from 
the Hotel Kahn. It is published in 
the large volume on the Kahn Collec- 
tion that was issued at that time. 
It was presented to the Province by 
the Friends of the Museum. 

C.T.C. 



NEW MEMBERS 

The Museum takes pleasure in announcing 
the election of the following members: 

ANNUAL MEMBERS 
K. J. Dunstan, Esq.; 
E. F. Ely, Esq.; 
W. K. George, Esq.; 
C. V. Harding, Esq.; 
T. F. Matthews, Esq.; 
Brig.-Gen. C. H. Mitchell; 
Morden Neilson, Esq.; 
John Northway, Esq.; 
Robert Parker, Esq. 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 



3n flDemoriam 

Sir Edmund Walker 
Sir Edmund Osler 

Throuch the death of Sir Edmund 
Walker and Sir Edmund Osier in 
1924 the Royal Ontario Museum has 
sustained a double loss. It is with 
the deepest regret that we record 
the passing of these loyal friends and 
founders of the Museum. Any trib- 
ute to their memory seems inade- 
quate when we consider how much 
the Museum is indebted to the vision 
and courageous enterprise of these 
two men, for it was largely through 
their devoted and untiring efforts 
that the Museum was established. 
In the years that have intervened 
since its opening in 1914, their wise 
counsel and wide influence in govern- 
ment and university circles have been 
of inestimable value. 

As Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees from the beginning, Sir 
Edmund Walker took the keenest 
interest in every phase of museum 
activity. His contagious enthusi- 
asm and kind encouragement were a 
constant source of inspiration to all 
connected with the institution. His 
cultivated artistic taste and expert 
knowledge made his opinion and 
advice eagerly sought by the Direct- 
ors of the Museum. An intimate 
knowledge of the various collections 
was acquired by frequent visits to 
the galleries, and these hours stolen 
from his crowded days were to him 
times of recreation and refreshment. 



Among his many gifts to the Arch- 
aeological Museum may be mentioned 
important contributions to the Chi- 
nese, Faience, Indian and Japanese 
Collections, and valuable books for 
the reference library. Without his 
influence and financial backing, count- 
less priceless treasures now in the 
galleries would have been lost to 
Canada forever. Giving so freely 
of his own time and talents he was 
able to enlist the interest and co-op- 
eration of many of Canada's foremost 
citizens. 

Like Sir Edmund Walker, a member 
of the original committee formed in 
1911 to consider the founding of a 
museum, and later as a representative 
of the Provincial Government on the 
Board of Trustees, Sir Edmund Osier 
was closely connected with the Mu- 
seum until the time of his death, 
and was one of its most liberal sup- 
porters. In addition to large con- 
tributions of money, his generous 
gifts have added materially to the 
Chinese and Faience Collections, 
while the unique and very valuable 
pictures of Indian life by Paul Kane 
and George Catlin have added enor- 
mously to the interest and attraction 
of the Indian Gallery. 

Future generations of Canadians 
will remember with gratitude Sir 
Edmund Walker and Sir Edmund 
Osier, who with foresight and courage 
planned for the day when the Royal 
Ontario Museum should take its 
place among the foremost museums 
of the world. 

A.H.R. 




BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 





THE STURGE COLLECTION 



GREEK TERRACOTTA STATUETTES 
IV-III CENTURY B.C. 



GIFT OF SIGMUND SAMUEL, ESQ. 



TWO LADIES OF TANAGRA 

Greek craftsmen worked in clay from 
very early times, and produced in 
this humble material, small figures 
which show in a general way the 
styles of the various periods of 
sculpture. These little statuettes 
have been found in all parts of the 
Greek world, but they reached their 
highest perfection at Tanagra, in 
Boeotia. The artisans, who made 
them there, showed such a consum- 
mate feeling for art, and such numbers 
have been unearthed in the graves 
of that town, that the name Tanagra 



has been applied to a whole series 
of idealised studies from real life, 
in terracotta. These world-famous 
Tanagra statuettes belong to the 
time of Alexander the Great and his 
successors, 350-200 B.C. 

The most successful studies are 
those of women and girls, which 
portray womanly gentleness and grace 
with inimitable skill. These ladies 
of long ago still look upon us with 
a poise which the most distinguished 
social leaders of today might well 
envy. They are a charming com- 
bination of dignity and repose, yet 
so human in their dainty prettiness. 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 



They are usually wrapped in mantles, 
which sometimes envelop even their 
heads and their hands. Sometimes 
they wear small round hats; some- 
times they carry leaf-shaped fans. 
They usually appear singly, but 
occasionally in pairs they discuss 
with each other the topics of the day 
or, more probably, the latest mode 
of headdress, for their auburn hair 
is always faultlessly arranged. The 
fact that these varied studies of 
female figures, in every variety of 
graceful pose, show such similarity, 
although no two are exactly alike, 
caused M. Pottter to say very aptly 
that, "All are sisters but few are 
twins." 

It has frequently been noted that 
these little statuettes bear marks of 
the influence of the matchless sculptor 
Praxiteles, who chose by preference 
for his statues those subjects in which 
beauty and grace were the leading 
features. This Praxitelean resem- 
blance appears very strongly in a figure 
which was purchased in Athens by 
the late Dr. Allen Sturge, of England, 
and presented to the Museum by 
Sigmund Samuel, Esq. This tall 
slender lady (height, 11 in.) stands 
in quiet pose with one knee slightly 
bent. She is clad in a chiton of thin 
material, over which is thrown a 
heavier mantle, which covers her 
head and the upper part of her body 
and falls gracefully at her left side. 
On her left shoulder is perched a dove 
whose head is now missing. Although 
the delicate rose, blue, and white 
with which these figures were origin- 
ally painted have in many cases 
almost entirely disappeared, this little 
lady still has much light blue on her 
mantle and white on her chiton. The 
gentle grace of the figure, the pose, 
the perfect oval of the face, and the 
dreamy gaze all recall the work of 
Praxiteles. Moreover, the treatment 
of the drapery reminds one of that 
on the Muses, on the reliefs which 



ornamented the base of a sculptured 
group of I.eto and her children, which 
was discovered by French excavators 
at Mantinea, in 1887. Praxiteles 
was the maker of this group, which 
Pausanias mentions, and probably 
the reliefs were executed by his 
assistants under his direction. It 
seems at least possible that the potter 
who made this little statuette in the 
Museum, had seen the Muses on the 
Mantinean relief and that he had 
them in mind when he moulded this 
figure. 

The second statuette, which was 
formerly in the van Branteghem Col- 
lection (Cf. Froehner, Catalogue of the 
van Branteghem Collection , No. 381) 
is from Tanagra. It was also acquired 
in the Sturge Collection and presented 
to the Museum by Mr. Samuel. This 
lady (height, 10j^ in.) wears the 
costume of the women of Tan- 
agra, blue chiton, rose himation, 
and white shoes. In her ears are 
pendant earrings. Her right hand, 
which is enveloped in her mantle, 
rests on a column; in her left she 
holds an apple, once gilded. Her 
right foot is on the base of the column. 
This attitude of raising one foot and 
placing it on a slight elevation ap- 
pears in sculpture of the Hellenistic 
period and later. It is found, for ex- 
ample, 'in the Aphrodite of Melos, the 
Aphrodite of Capua, and the Nike of 
Brescia. Although this little lady 
is not so beautiful as the preceding, 
yet she has very delicate features, a 
gentle expression, and a perfect oval 
face. 

Though only miniatures in terra- 
cotta, these and other statuettes in 
the collection in the Museum have 
certainly caught something of the 
spirit of Greek sculpture of the fourth 
century B.C. Moreover, they seem 
to bring us in touch with the every- 
day life of the people in a way im- 
possible to the more imposing master- 
pieces of sculpture. C.G.H. 




THE DESCENT FROM THE CROSS 

OAK WOOD CARVING 
FLEMISH, EARLY XVI CENTURY 

GIFT OF MRS. WALTER H. CLEMES 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 



A LATE GOTHIC 
WOODCARVING 

A fine example of Flemish wood 
sculpture of the early sixteenth cen- 
tury is the oak group, "Descent 
from the Cross," the gift of Mrs. 
Walter H. Clemes. 

Except that the original cross is 
missing, now replaced, the group 
(23 in. high; 12 7-8 in. wide) is in 
excellent condition, the oak being 
sound and of dark, rich colour. There 
are no traces of paint, although the 
sculpture of the time was usually 
painted with realistic colours, height- 
ened by a lavish use of gold. 

The seven figures are arranged in a 
group of admirable balance. One 
feels uneasily that the lower part of 
Joseph of Arimathea's body, unseen 
as he stands upon the ladder, is 
unnaturally short; otherwise the 
relative proportions of the figures are 
quite satisfying. 

The whole Gothic period was the 
most essentially Christian of any 
artistic epoch. 1 Sculpture and paint- 
ing not only depicted religious sub- 
jects, but laid the stress not upon the 
beauties of the body, but upon the 
thoughts and emotions of the soul. 
In the thirteenth century, the in- 
tellectual faith of the early Gothic 
period was expressed in art by 
simplicity and idealism. By the 
fifteenth century, faith had become 
emotional, and its artistic expression 
contained marked notes of pathos 
and passion, with increasing realism 
in the treatment of figures, draperies 
and background. 

The appeal of this late Gothic 
group, with its pitiful central figure, 
is to the emotions. With the excep- 
tion of the good-natured figure at the 
left, bearing a jar of spices, all the 



x Cf. C. R. Post, A History of European 
and American Sculpture from the Early 
Christian Period to the Present Day. Chap- 
ters V and VI. 



faces express a sorrow that mounts 
to agony in the straining arms and 
body of Mary Magdalene. Realistic 
treatment is pronounced in the model- 
ling of the faces, in the bulging 
muscles of Joseph of Arimathea's 
arm as it grips the cross, in the limp- 
ness of the body of the dead Christ, 
and in the outlining of the other 
bodies beneath their garments. 

The group also illustrates char- 
acteristics that originated in the 
Flemish style of Gothic realism. The 
long lines of drapery are broken up 
into small, complicated spaces. This 
"tormenting" of the folds, combined 
with their marked angularity and 
projection, produces an effect of 
strong light and shade usually con- 
sidered peculiar to painting. 

Wood was the favourite material 
of the Flemish sculptor. Its working 
seemed a national gift, and it was 
also easier to export than stone. All 
the elaborately carved articles of 
religious furniture found a ready 
sale in Europe, and throughout a 
large part of the continent the influ- 
ence of the Flemish style of realism 
was stronger than that of the French. 

E.M.G. 



A CHINESE LAMP OF GREEK 
FORM 

A concrete example of Western in- 
fluence, even on utensils of daily life 
in China, appears in a small lamp in 
the George Crofts Collection, which 
came to the Museum recently from 
the Province of Honan. This lamp 
(height, 2 1/8 in.; length, 5 1/2 in.) 
belongs to the Sung Dynasty, 960- 
1280 A.D., or possibly to the T'ang 
Dynasty, 618-906 A.D. It has a 
heavy, tan stoneware body, which is 
almost entirely covered with a thick, 
dark olive green glaze. As is custom- 
ary in Chinese pottery of this period, 
the glaze does not quite cover the 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 





GREEK LAMP 



CHINESE POTTERY LAMP 



base nor does it run completely over 
the projection at the side, nor the 
end of the nozzle. 

The startling fact in regard to this 
Chinese lamp is its striking resem- 
blance, in form, to the Greek lamp of 
the Ptolemaic Period, which is shown 
with it in the illustration. The lamp 
of the T'ang and Sung Dynasties 
was, probably, a saucer lamp. The 
form of the lamp shown here is so 
foreign to the Chinese shape, and so 
nearly identical to that of the typical 
Greek lamp of the third century B.C., 
that it seems probable that at some 



time this common Ptolemaic type of 
lamp, w ith the double convex body and 
projection at one side, found its way 
into China and was copied there. 
The Chinese rather improved on the 
design. They gave the top a vertical 
rim so that the oil might not spill 
so easily, and they slanted the nozzle 
upw ard slightly in order to hold the 
wick more securely. 

The Greek lamp, G. 2. (height, 
1 3-8 in., length, 4 1-2 in.) which is 
used for comparison is one of a large 
number of similar lamps, in the 
Walter Massey Collection, in the 




GREEK TERRACOTTA LAMP 

III-II CENTURY B.C. 

THE WALTER MASSEY COLLECTION 



CHINESE POTTERY LAMP 

t'ang OR POSSIBLY SUNG DYNASTY 

THE GEORGE CROFTS COLLECTION 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 



Museum. It is made of red clay, 
has a red polished slip on the upper 
part, and comes from the Fayum, 
Egypt. 

The T'ang Dynasty was an age 
of expansion in territory and travel 
in China, and of contact with ideas 
of the outside world. In Chinese art, 
objects of this period, particularly, 
show the influence of the Western 
world, of Persia and even of Greece. 



This lamp is only one of many things 
in the George Crofts Collection which 
remind one of classical art. Our 
knowledge of 1 'ang and Sung pottery 
and porcelain has only just begun. 
Perhaps, as our information increases, 
we shall find many more startling 
resemblances to objects with which 
we are already familiar in the Greek 
world. 

C.G.H. 





& 




TORTOISE-SHELL TEA CADDIES 
THE LATTER PART OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 



OLD ENGLISH TEA CADDIES 

The Museum is gradually acquiring 
an extremely fascinating collection 
of old English tea caddies, of which 
the first thirty-one pieces were pre- 
sented by the Salada Tea Co. of 
Canada, Limited. Another similar 
collection is in the Victoria and Albert 
Museum in London. 

These charming little caddies are 
well worth careful examination, be- 
cause they represent very skilful 
workmanship and show great variety 
and beauty of detail. The dainty 
little chests were made during the 
very finest period of English cabinet- 
making, and the craftsman seems to 
have lavished his utmost care and 
love upon them. It has been said 
that some of them, which were cer- 
tainly produced at a great cost of 
time and infinite patience, were the 



diploma works of apprentices after 
their long period of training. This 
suggestion is rather supported by 
their great variety. It is seldom that 
one finds a duplicate; occasionally 
a pair of caddies was made, but this 
was unusual. 

The term "Caddy" is doubtless a 
corruption of "Catty", a parcel 
weighing about 1 1/3 pounds, in 
which the Chinese merchants formerly 
made up the smaller packages of tea. 
The "Catty" is still in use at treaty 
ports. Strictly speaking, therefore, 
the "Catty" or "Cady" is not the 
outer shell but the inner case, a 
distinction which may have caused 
Chippendale to call his designs for 
these pieces tea chests. 

In connection with tea caddies it 
may be interesting to recall the 
history of the introduction of tea into 
England. The Chinese seem to have 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 



known and used it about 500 A.D., 
but it was not brought into Europe 
until the end of the 16th century, and 
then only in very small quantities. 
In England, it began to be used as a 
beverage about the middle of the 
17th century. Samuel Pepys, writ- 
ing in his wonderful diary, on the 
28th of September, 1660, says, "I did 
send for a cup of tee (a China drink) 
of which I had never drank before", 
and in 1662, he writes, "Home and 
there find my wife making of tea, a 
drink which Mr. Pelling the Pothicary 
tells her is good for her cold and de- 
fluxions." About this time tea was 
costing from £5 to £10 a pound and 
a tea house was opened in Exchange 
Alley, by a merchant named Garra- 
way. 

In 1678 the English East India 
Company imported 4,713 lbs., but 
by 1725 the quantity had increased 
to 370,323 lbs. The price then was 
from ten to twenty-five shillings a 
pound. As the country grew in 
prosperity during the first half of the 
18th century, tea services became 
very popular, and so these charming 
little chests were designed for con- 
taining the delicacy. 

The oldest type of caddy in the 
collection is No. 1, of the Chippendale 
period and make, which is very 
similar to the large pieces of furniture 
designed by Chippendale as "Clothes 
presses." It is of fine old Spanish 
mahogany and is extremely well made 
and finished in excellent taste, show- 
ing great restraint. 

Following this comes such an ex- 
ample as No. 2 in which the workman 
took advantage of the curious grain 
of the wood, and cut the hard and 
the sappy parts to form a geometrical 
design. 

By 1775, the consumption of tea 
had risen to 5,648,000 lbs., and in 
1801 to23,730,1501bs. Itwas between 
those dates that the prettiest and 
daintiest of the caddies were made. 



Nos. 3 and 4 are of charming oval 
shape; the former is of satinwood, 
beautifully painted, while the latter 
is inlaid with various kinds of choice 
wood. Nos. 5 and 6 are octagonal 
and are made of satinwood and hare- 
wood, most delicately treated. These 
styles were followed by the larger 
caddies, such as Nos. 7 and 8, often 
with two or three divisions for various 
kinds of tea. By this time a fashion 
had arisen for using other materials 
besides wood, and we have the 
beautiful little ivory caddies, Nos. 
9, 10, and 11, inlaid with silver, gold, 
and mother-of-pearl, and exquisitely 
finished with narrow borders and 
stringings of tortoise-shell. No. 10 is 
a very rare example and has on the 
front a medallion with a portrait of 
Lord Nelson. The form is unique, 
and the workmanship is quite ex- 
ceptional. 

The illustration at the top of this 
article shows three very choice little 
caddies in tortoise-shell, one of which 
has a beautiful pattern in buhl work. 
No. 12 is a very rare caddy of pressed 
tortoise-shell; No. 13 is an interesting 
example of old English lacquer; and 
No. 14 is in black lacquer, with a 
heart-shaped plaquette of exquisitely 
pierced silver, inlaid. 

A most interesting and very rare 
little caddy is No. 15. It is fine in 
shape and beautifully painted with a 
seascape and sailing ship, which may 
represent one of those very tea 
clippers that used to make such won- 
derful records. 

No. 16 is a good example of the 
curious old curled paper work, cut, 
rolled, and put in on edge in a kind 
of paper mosaic. The panels are 
surrounded by delicate inlaid wood 
borders. This curled paper work is 
mentioned in various old books and 
was sometimes done by ladies. No. 17 
is a good specimen of straw work 
which was most carefully cut and 
laid in formal designs on the prepared 



10 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 







M i 






OLD ENCLISH TEA CADDIES 
NOS. 1, 4, 7, AND 8 WERE PRESENTED BY THE SALADA TEA CO., OF CANADA, LIMITED 



11 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 







10 



11 






13 



12 



14 






16 



15 



17 



OLD ENGLISH TEA CADDIES 

OF IVORY, LACQUER, TORTOISE-SHELL, CURLED PAPER, AND STRAW WORK. NOS. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 

16, AND 17 WERE PRESENTIID BY THE SALADA TEA CO., OF CANADA, LIMITED 



12 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO 



MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 






19 




- 



23 



. 




24 



vn , 19 1n _ 0LD ENGLISH TEA CADDIES 

-, 18. 19, AND 24 WERE PRESENTED By THE salada t£a ^ of cANA ^ limit£d 



13 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 



wooden box. This work is often attrib- 
uted to the French prisoners who 
were confined in England during the 
Napoleonic wars. 

No. 18, which is early 19th century, 
is the latest in date. By this time 
the centre of the caddy held a glass 
sugar bowl, and from this period date 
most of the caddies of sarcophagus 
form. Although this is a very ugly 
shape in larger pieces of furniture, 
such as wine-coolers and cellarettes, 
yet when reduced to the tiny pro- 
portions of a tea caddy, it becomes 
quite pleasing. Good examples are 
No. 19 and the rare little pair, Nos. 
20 and 21. 

No. 22 is a very dainty box of 
unusually small size, decorated with 
pretty old prints, illustrating the 
seasons of the year. 

No. 23, which dates from early 
Victorian days, is a rather amusing 
caddy in the form of a cottage. Of 
this same period is No. 25, in papier- 
mache. No. 24 is a Chinese lacquer 



box made in China for shipment to 
England, and fitted with Chinese 
pewter caddies. Of silver tea caddies, 
which are often very fine, beautifully 
made, and most charming, the Mu- 
seum unfortunately possesses no ex- 
ample. 

The "Tea-poy," an ugly, clumsy 
piece of furniture, a box on legs or 
stand, well-made but quite uninter- 
esting, succeeded the tea caddies. 

Tea was expensive, so it will be 
noticed that every caddy is fitted 
with a lock to guard its contents. 
One Persian box in the collection even 
has a musical lock to prevent the 
misappropriation of the tea. Those 
were days of leisure and very careful 
housekeeping, but even so, it must 
often have been tiresome to look for 
the key each time the caddy was used, 
and sometimes it was not forthcoming. 
The poet Cowper in one of his letters 
reminds Lady Hesketh, "When you 
went you took with you the key of 
the caddv." T.S. 




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OLD ENGLISH TEA CADDIES 
THE GIFT OF THE SALADA TEA CO. OF CANADA, LIMITED 



14 



BULLETIN OF THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 




BRONZE STATUE OF RAMA 

INDIA, XVI CENTURY 

RAMA IS THE INCARNATION OF VISHNU 

ONE OF THE BRAHMANICAL TRINITY 



IS 



ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 
OF ARCHAEOLOGY 



Corner of Bloor Street and Avenue Road 



Director — Professor C. T. Currelly, 
O.Medj., M.A., F.R.S.C, F.R.G.S. 

Keeper of the Classical Collection- 
Miss Cornelia G. Harcum, M.A., 
Ph.D. 

Art Adviser and Agent for Europe- 
Thomas Sutton, Esq. 

The Board of Trustees 

J. B. O'Brian, Esq., K.C., Acting Chairman. 

Sir Robert Falconer, K.C.M.G., D.Litt., 
LL.D., D.D., D.C.L. Oxon. 

The Honourable G. Howard Ferguson, 
B.A., K.C., LL.D. 

The Honourable Charles McCrea, K.C., 
M.L.A. 

The Honourable and Reverend Canon 
H. J. Cody, M.A., D.D., LL.D. 

Mrs. H. D. Warren. 

Sigmund Samuel, Esq. 

Sir Joseph Flavelle, Bart. 

Colonel R. W. Leonard. 

Miss Helen Reynar, Secretary to the Board. 

Members of the Museum 

Benefactors, who contribute .$10,000 

Fellows in Perpetuity, who con- 
tribute 5,000 

Fellows for Life, who contribute 1,000 

Friends, who pay annually 500 

Fellows, who pay annually 100 

Sustaining Members, who pay an- 

ually 25 

Annual Members 10 

Privileges — Benefactors and Fellows in 
Perpetuity may arrange to have a member 
of the staff as a guide. 



All members are entitled to the following 
privileges: 

A ticket admitting the member, his family, 
and non-resident friends, on Monday, Wed- 
nesday, and Friday. 

Twenty complimentary tickets a year, 
each admitting the bearer once, on Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday. 

All bulletins issued. 



Admission 

The Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m. all week-days except Christmas Day 
and the morning of New Year's Day. It is 
also open Sunday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

Admission is free Sunday, Tuesday, 
Thursday, and Saturday, and on all public 
holidays. On other days the admission fee 
is fifteen cents. 

University students are admitted without 
charge on presentation of their registration 
cards. 

All classes from the schools, art students, 
and study groups are admitted free. 

Members and those who hold compli- 
mentary tickets are admitted Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday on presentation 
of their tickets. 



Guidance 

Teachers with classes, and visitors who 
desire the services of the official guide may 
make arrangements through the Secretary 
of the Museum. 



Photographs 



Prints of photographs of objects in the 
Museum may be ordered at the door. 



Additional copies of this bulletin may be obtained from the Department of University Extension, 
University of Toronto, Toronto. Canada. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS